I’m Violet, my life is the ball.
From Charles M. Schulz Peanuts #3 (March 2012). Story by Shane Houghton, art by Matt Whitlock.

I’m Violet, my life is the ball.

From Charles M. Schulz Peanuts #3 (March 2012). Story by Shane Houghton, art by Matt Whitlock.

ryanwinn:

Batgirl from December. Brush and markers. I love yellow and pink.

ryanwinn:

Batgirl from December. Brush and markers. I love yellow and pink.

How embarrassing. Don’t say anything and they won’t know it was you.
From some Richie Rich comic, I don’t know which. I got this from the Occupy Richie Rich blog, which you definitely should be following if you have ever read the adventures of the poor little rich boy.

How embarrassing. Don’t say anything and they won’t know it was you.

From some Richie Rich comic, I don’t know which. I got this from the Occupy Richie Rich blog, which you definitely should be following if you have ever read the adventures of the poor little rich boy.

In case you want a replacement for that Batman slapping Robin pic that’s been done to death, here’s Batgirl slapping Cleopatra.
From Batman ‘66 #30 (March 2014). Script by Jeff Parker, art by Joëlle Jones.

In case you want a replacement for that Batman slapping Robin pic that’s been done to death, here’s Batgirl slapping Cleopatra.

From Batman ‘66 #30 (March 2014). Script by Jeff Parker, art by Joëlle Jones.

giddygirlie:


"WOULD ANY SANE PERSON think dumpster diving would have stopped Hitler, or that composting would have ended slavery or brought about the eight-hour workday, or that chopping wood and carrying water would have gotten people out of Tsarist prisons, or that dancing naked around a fire would have helped put in place the Voting Rights Act of 1957 or the Civil Rights Act of 1964? Then why now, with all the world at stake, do so many people retreat into these entirely personal “solutions”?
Part of the problem is that we’ve been victims of a campaign of systematic misdirection. Consumer culture and the capitalist mindset have taught us to substitute acts of personal consumption (or enlightenment) for organized political resistance. An Inconvenient Truth helped raise consciousness about global warming. But did you notice that all of the solutions presented had to do with personal consumption—changing light bulbs, inflating tires, driving half as much—and had nothing to do with shifting power away from corporations, or stopping the growth economy that is destroying the planet? Even if every person in the United States did everything the movie suggested, U.S. carbon emissions would fall by only 22 percent. Scientific consensus is that emissions must be reduced by at least 75 percent worldwide.
Or let’s talk water. We so often hear that the world is running out of water. People are dying from lack of water. Rivers are dewatered from lack of water. Because of this we need to take shorter showers. See the disconnect? Because I take showers, I’m responsible for drawing down aquifers? Well, no. More than 90 percent of the water used by humans is used by agriculture and industry. The remaining 10 percent is split between municipalities and actual living breathing individual humans. Collectively, municipal golf courses use as much water as municipal human beings. People (both human people and fish people) aren’t dying because the world is running out of water. They’re dying because the water is being stolen.
…Personal change doesn’t equal social change.”
— Derrick Jensen | Forget Shorter Showers: Why Personal Changes Does Not Equal Political Change

Strongly agree. 

giddygirlie:

"WOULD ANY SANE PERSON think dumpster diving would have stopped Hitler, or that composting would have ended slavery or brought about the eight-hour workday, or that chopping wood and carrying water would have gotten people out of Tsarist prisons, or that dancing naked around a fire would have helped put in place the Voting Rights Act of 1957 or the Civil Rights Act of 1964? Then why now, with all the world at stake, do so many people retreat into these entirely personal “solutions”?

Part of the problem is that we’ve been victims of a campaign of systematic misdirection. Consumer culture and the capitalist mindset have taught us to substitute acts of personal consumption (or enlightenment) for organized political resistance. An Inconvenient Truth helped raise consciousness about global warming. But did you notice that all of the solutions presented had to do with personal consumption—changing light bulbs, inflating tires, driving half as much—and had nothing to do with shifting power away from corporations, or stopping the growth economy that is destroying the planet? Even if every person in the United States did everything the movie suggested, U.S. carbon emissions would fall by only 22 percent. Scientific consensus is that emissions must be reduced by at least 75 percent worldwide.

Or let’s talk water. We so often hear that the world is running out of water. People are dying from lack of water. Rivers are dewatered from lack of water. Because of this we need to take shorter showers. See the disconnect? Because I take showers, I’m responsible for drawing down aquifers? Well, no. More than 90 percent of the water used by humans is used by agriculture and industry. The remaining 10 percent is split between municipalities and actual living breathing individual humans. Collectively, municipal golf courses use as much water as municipal human beings. People (both human people and fish people) aren’t dying because the world is running out of water. They’re dying because the water is being stolen.

…Personal change doesn’t equal social change.”

Derrick Jensen | Forget Shorter Showers: Why Personal Changes Does Not Equal Political Change

Strongly agree. 

(Source: america-wakiewakie)

sucysucyfivedolla:

just fucking eat this whole sack of flour

sucysucyfivedolla:

just fucking eat this whole sack of flour

gailsimone:

jessehimself:

seraphica:

Kim Kelley-Wagner has two daughters who were adopted from China. In everyday life, they have been subjected to horrid statements from people - to their faces, to their mother as they stood by her, etc. In this photo collection, shared on her blog, Kim and her daughters (Lily and Meika) put these ignorant cruelties front and center. [x]

"I have tried to explain to my daughters that people do not say these things to be mean, they say them out of ignorance, which is why I am sharing some of them. Words are powerful, they can become tools or weapons, choose to use them wisely."


Good GOD.

"Tiger Lily Doesn't Equal Human Torch" plus a very long rant

thisfeliciaday:

image

The other day I posted this tweet:

"Wait they cast a white chick for Tiger Lily in the new Peter Pan? Did they not remember Lone Ranger last year? Or, you know, racism?"

(If you didn’t hear, Rooney Mara is supposedly playing Tiger Lily, who is a princess of the “Native” tribe, in the…

mollyalicehoy:

Basically every conversation I had this past week.

mollyalicehoy:

Basically every conversation I had this past week.

nancyishappy:

i don’t even know you’re alive

Admitting You’re Terrible

I’m currently working on Mark Park and the Flume of Destiny. It’s the third book in my series, The Future Next Door, and it is also, not coincidentally, the third book I have ever written.

Writing is a skill, of course, and like any skill, you get better at it the more you practice it. My first book, Alan Lennox and the Temp Job of Doom, took me just about a year to write, from first word to publication. I learned a lot as I was writing it - both from the act of writing itself, and from actually studying the craft of writing by reading what other, smarter writers than me had to say - and by the time I was finished with the first draft, I realized I needed to go back to the top and do some pretty serious revisions. It was a long process, but worth it in the end. It’s a good book.

The second book, Caitlin Ross and the Commute from Hell, came a lot easier. Not easy, just easier. It took about seven months in all. Less time because I had figured out that I’m a plotter - I need to break the story down before I start to write, not figure it out as I go along. This resulted in the first draft needing far fewer revisions. It was even more fun to write than the first book had been, and I think it shows in the end result. It’s a better book.

I say I started working on Mark Park a few weeks ago, but really, I started it at the same time I started Caitlin Ross. After I finished the first book, I plotted out all three of the remaining installments in the series - there’s an overall story building, and I had to know where I was going in order to know how to get there. So I had a blueprint in front of me when I actually sat down to write book three.

But…but but but. Something was off. Writing when I got home from work was becoming a chore to be dreaded instead of the best part of my day. I pushed through, telling myself I was just hitting a wall, I was tired, I was cranky, I needed to be changed, anything except admitting there was something wrong with what I was writing. I got through six chapters before I realized that the book just wasn’t going to work. The book I had plotted would not be a good book, let alone a better book. It would be a bad book.

So I threw it all away. All my meticulous plotting. All those weeks of work. Even the few little bits I liked. Once I beat my ego into submission and admitted that I was doing bad work, and gave myself permission to let it go, I was able to see more clearly what was wrong. And then I fixed it.

Tonight I finished my second take on the plot breakdown, and I’m bouncing up and down in my chair with excitement. I know it’s good. And I can’t wait to start writing again.

Random Advice: The Opening Scene

gailsimone:

I get asked a fairly constant stream of questions about writing, particularly for comics, for obvious reasons.

What I find is that a lot of the teaching methods out there focus on theory, rather than practical advice. What do I do about writer’s block? How do I make characters interesting? How…

katedanley:

For all of you Maggie MacKay fans, your wait is over!  Book IV is now officially here!
Kindle
Nook
Paperback
iTunes (coming soon!)
Kobo (coming soon!)
M&K Tracking
Book IV: Maggie MacKay - Magical Tracker Series
M&K Tracking is finally up and running, but business has been the pits for Maggie and Killian… that is until someone tries to open a portal to the pits of the Dark Dimension via Father Killarney’s church.  When it comes to vanquishing evil, who are you going to call?  M&K Tracking.  It is a hell of a job, but someone’s gotta do it.WARNING: This book contains cussing, brawling, and unladylike behavior.  Proceed at your own risk.

katedanley:

For all of you Maggie MacKay fans, your wait is over!  Book IV is now officially here!


M&K Tracking

Book IV: Maggie MacKay - Magical Tracker Series

M&K Tracking is finally up and running, but business has been the pits for Maggie and Killian… that is until someone tries to open a portal to the pits of the Dark Dimension via Father Killarney’s church.  When it comes to vanquishing evil, who are you going to call?  M&K Tracking.  It is a hell of a job, but someone’s gotta do it.

WARNING: This book contains cussing, brawling, and unladylike behavior.  Proceed at your own risk.

noheroposts-deactivated20140315 asked: I recently found that I really like writing. I have ideas in my head just bumping around, but when it comes to putting them down, I freeze and suddenly find myself discouraged. Any advice on how to get over this?

gailsimone:

What you are describing is very common, almost everyone has that at first. But until you start actually writing stuff, it’s like having a hot rod engine with no actual car.

I don’t judge people by how much they write, but they have to write something. 

For most writers, writing isn’t a dawdle, it’s a very serious goddamn business and it has its rewards and its costs. You need to be aware of that, and one of the costs is overcoming inertia and fear. 

You can be a bestselling author and you still have those things to deal with and conquer. In this, the famous and celebrated writer is no different than someone who writes fanfic strictly for their own pleasure. They both have to beat those two factors.

So what you do is minimize them. And the way to do that is habit, just as any artists does. A musician practices scales, an artist sketches apples, they do a small thing over and over, and they gain confidence and skill all the time.

The grand concerto and the oil painting masterpiece come at the end, after thousands of scales and sketches. 

You want to be a writer, so do what they do. Play scales. Draw sketches.

Write short things. For yourself. Write a character sketch. Write a plot outline. Write a story in a paragraph. Write a review. Short things you can finish. It is the finishing that is key. 

Each time, you get better. Each time, you learn how to play the scale and sketch the fruit and then each time, you have those in your tool bag and knowing there’s tools in your tool bag gives you confidence, I guarantee it. Odds are, some of your short things will grow in scale as you write them.

Play the scales.

Do the sketches.

The concerto will follow, honest.